GENEALOGY

How To Trace Your Genealogy
Home Sources
Letters, photographs, baby books, important papers, family records of births, marriages, deaths, books, birthday cards, etc.
Contact Relatives
See what information they can supply you with.
Obituaries
Sometimes gives biographical data.
Cemetery and Tombstones
Cemetery records and/or tombstone inscriptions can often be helpful.
Census
Start with the census for the last year available and work backwards.
Naturalization
Certificates
Obtain birth, death and/or marriage certificates.
Ship Arrivals
Military and Veterans Records
These have a wealth of information.
Church Records
Court Records
Wills, probate, divorce, child custody.
Social Security Records
Monograms
Yearbooks
School Records
Alumni Lists
Fraternal Organizations
Passport Applications.

Initials in Genealogy
a.a.s. - died in the year of his/her age.
d.s.p. - died without issue.
d.s.p.l. - died without legitimate issue.
d.s.p.m.s. - died without surviving male issue.
d.s.p.s - died without surviving issue.
d.unm - died unmarried.
d.v.p. - died in the lifetime of his father.
d.v.m. - died in the lifetime of his mother.
Et al - and others.
F.L.T. - friendship, love and truth.
Inst - present month.
Liber - book or volume.
Nepos - grandson.
Nunc Nun - an oral will, written by a witness.
Ob - he/she died.
Rel. or Relict - widow or widower.
Res. or Residue - widow or widower.
Sic - exact copy as written.
Testes - witnesses.
Ult - late.
Ux or vs - wife.
Viz - namely.

Genealogical Societies
Have been around for over 150 years.
Societies, and their members
Share news and important information.
Preserve records.
Improve access.
Share information.
Provide instruction so we can learn how to do our tasks better and easier.
Gather records into research facilities.

Epidemics in Genealogy
When researching genealogy, you might notice periods when whole families seemed to die. This period could be related to epidemics.

1657 - Boston - Measles
1687 - Boston - Measles
1690 - New York - Yellow Fever
1713 - Boston - Measles
1729 - Boston - Measles
1732-33 - Worldwide - Influenza
1738 - South Carolina - Smallpox
1739-40 - Boston - Measles
1759 - North America - Influenza
1761 - North America , West Indies - Influenza
1772 - North America - Measles
1775 - New England - Epidemic
1775-76 - Worldwide - Influenza
1788 - Philadelphia , NY - Measles
1794 - Philadelphia - Yellow Fever
1796-97 - Philadelphia - Yellow Fever
1798 - Philadelphia - Yellow Fever
1803 - New York - Yellow Fever
1820-23 - Nationwide - Fever
1831-32 - Nationwide - Asiatic Cholera
1832 - New York - Cholera
1833 - Columbus, OH - Cholera
1834 - New York City - Cholera
1837 - Philadelphia - Typhus
1841 - Nationwide - Yellow fever
1847 New Orleans - Yellow fever
1847-48 Worldwide - Influenza
1848-49 North America - Cholera
1849 New York - Cholera
1850 Nationwide - Yellow Fever
1850-51 North America - Influenza
1851 Coles County, IL - Cholera
1851 Missouri - Cholera
1852 Nationwide - Yellow fever
1855 Nationwide - Yellow fever
1857-59 Worldwide - Influenza
1860-61 Pennsylvania - Smallpox
1873-75 North America & Europe - Influenza
1878 - New Orleans - Yellow Fever
1885 - Plymouth, PA - Typhoid
1886 - Jacksonville, FL - Yellow Fever
1918 - Worldwide - Influenza

Locating Female Ancestors in Genealogy
Female ancestors are referred to as the "umbilical" line.
In researching female ancestors we must contend with name changes, more then one marriage or certain cultures.
Most searched genealogical records deal with men, because women in past times had little or no legal rights.
Source for finding details on the females in your line are
City directories.
Voter's lists/registrations.
Cemetery records and tombstone inscriptions.
Church records.
Ship arrival manifests.
Military record and pension files of husband.
Military record and pension files for female.
Wills.
Land records.
Marriage records.
Newspapers.
School Records.
Medical Records.
Divorce Records.
Court Records.
Letters.
Family bibles and prayer books.
Diaries and journals.
Family heirlooms.

Paralumun New Age Village